Hateful Eight poster Quentin Tarantino’s next film.

Hateful Eight poster Quentin Tarantino’s next film.

austinkleon:


Joshua Wolf Shenk, Powers of Two: Finding the Essence of Innovation in Creative Pairs
I get sent a lot of books about “creativity” and “innovation,” and most of the time I throw them on the pile, but after Shenk’s Atlantic piece on Lennon and McCartney got passed around so much, I thought I’d give this one a spin (I also remembered that my friend Ryan Holiday recommended his book on Lincoln’s depression.) Glad I did, because so much of what Shenk has investigated here is stuff I looked into for Show Your Work!
Some excerpts, below.
How creativity really works doesn’t fit neatly into a traditional narrative

The lone-genius idea has become our dominant view of creativity not because of its inherent truth — in fact, it neglects and obscures the social qualities of innovation — but because it makes for a good story.
The network model has the opposite problem. It is basically true, but so complex that it can’t be easily made into narrative. Where the lone-genius model is galvanizing and simplistic, the network model is suitably nuanced but hard to apply to day-to-day life.

Shenk says the “creative pair,” on the other hand, gives us a clearer narrative as an anecdote to the lone-genius myth without getting scrambled by the messiness of networks.
The trouble with this knowledge is that people want the lone genius myth — something marketers certainly know:

Members of an audience want to identify with a single individual, a person with whom they can have an imagined relationship. It’s well known in publishing that coauthored books are generally a tougher sell than works by single authors because readers expect (often unconsciously) to be in direct communion with an author.

This is backed up by studies that have found “viewers value single creator art better than art created through a collaborative process”:

Our perception of art… is largely dictated by the amount of time and effort we think went into it. This notion was first put forth by Denis Dutton in his book The Art Instinct: Beauty, Pleasure, and Human Evolution, where he argued that we evaluate art not just by the final product, but also by the process that created it. We then use our evaluation of the process and final product to determine the quality of the piece we are admiring.

So, if people value our work based on what we tell them about our process, is our duty to be honest about how we work, or to give them a good story that makes them feel good about the work?
The lone genius idea is wrapped up in our Romantic notions of the individual and the self

…it’s a fantasty, a myth of achievement predicated on an even more fundamental myth of the enclosed, autonomous self for whom social experience is secondary.

The “lone genius” is usually backed up by a partner who remains in the shadows.
Take the couple I just wrote about: George Lucas and his first wife, Marcia. Or William Wordsworth and his sister, Dorothy. Or Tiger Woods — his caddy, Steve Williams wouldn’t just carry his bag, but he’d give him wrong yardage to compensate for his distance problems and he’d taunt him to “get his blood up,” and “deliberately misled him when he thought it would improve his play.”
There’s also a hilarious story about Picasso and his girlfriend, Francoise Gilot—every morning the chamber made would bring him coffee and toast and then he’d begin this ridiculous process:

Picasso “would groan and began his lamentations… He would complain of his sicknesses… He would declare his mercy, and how little anyone understood it. He would complain about a letter from [his ex-wife] Olga. Life was pointless. Why get up. Why paint. His soul itches. His life was unbearable.”

Then Gilot would basically have to convince him to get out of bed, and after AN HOUR, he’d finally get up.
As Shenk writes, “No one is freed of the burdens of everyday life. One may, however, outsource them.”
(Speaking later of John Lennon, Shenk has another good line: “No grownup lives like a kid unless someone around him takes the adult role.”)
“We need to be able to get wired up without overheating, and disconnect without going cold.”
Finding a balance between is tricky, and depends on the individual.

John Lennon, for instance, was so devoid of an internal relation that he had a hard time being by himself. “His reclusive lifestyle notwithstanding,” his friend Pete Shotton said, “John could never bear to be left completely alone — even when he was composing his songs. Much of my time at Kenwood was spent idly reading or watching TV while John, a few feed away, doodled at the piano or scribbled verses on a scrap of paper.” “If I am on my own for three days, doing nothing, “ [Lennon] told Hunter Davies in 1967, “I’m just not here…I have to see the others to see myself.”

And:

The art of living, as [Esther] Perel wrote, is to “balance our fundamental urge for connection with the urge to experience our own agency.”

(Which, come to think of it, reminds me of this Rob Walker quote I almost used in SYW.)
Side note: Simone de Beauvoir and Jean Paul Sartre used to work in the same cafe but at separate tables.
Even Emily Dickinson needed to connect.
She just had to do it through words.

”Her letters are beyond brilliant,” Christopher Benfey, a Dickinson authority who teaches at Mount Holyoke College, told me, “and you can’t really understand her as a poet and a writer without seeing that she approached this form, alongside her poetry, with equal energy and commitment.”

Dickinson wrote poems for specific people in her life and mailed them — she even sent “more than two hundred letters and two hundred and fifty poems” to her sister-in-law Susan, “even though they lived next door to each other.”
A good rivalry, if used constructively, can push the opposite parties further than they could go on their own.
Witness Lennon and McCartney’s competitiveness (Lennon said his new album would “probably scare [Paul] into doing something decent and then he’ll scare me into doing something decent, and I’ll scare him, like that.”) or Larry Bird and Magic Johnson.

“The feeling of rivalry,” [William James] said, ”lies at the very basis of our being, all social improvement being largely due to it… The deepest spring of action in us is the sight of action in another. The spectacle of effort is what awakens and sustains our own effort.”

On a side note to all this, I have a bad habit when reading books of wondering to myself what other structures the book could’ve taken, and whether I would have done it differently. I do wonder how this would’ve read if the “grand theory” of collaboration were stripped out and each creative pair were given their own chapter, with the stories simply juxtaposed against each other. This idea is actually alluded to in Shenk’s (rather strange, actually) epilogue:

About a year ago a friend of mine, an accomplished editor and Pulitzer Prize-winning writer, told me that the plan for the book — to consider scores of stories alongside one another — was nuts.

Shenk himself seems to have realized it is the stories of these pairings that really fly:

I’ve pushed for organization via the traditional mode of narrative; [my editor] has pushed for a more audacious organization by idea.

And that he’s well aware (as we all are) that this book is going on a certain spot in the bookstore shelves:

My job is to push against the conventions of “big idea” books. Eamon’s job is to hold the project to the primary necessities of the form.

Regardless, I found this a fascinating read. It comes out next week.
Filed under: my reading year 2014

austinkleon:

Joshua Wolf Shenk, Powers of Two: Finding the Essence of Innovation in Creative Pairs

I get sent a lot of books about “creativity” and “innovation,” and most of the time I throw them on the pile, but after Shenk’s Atlantic piece on Lennon and McCartney got passed around so much, I thought I’d give this one a spin (I also remembered that my friend Ryan Holiday recommended his book on Lincoln’s depression.) Glad I did, because so much of what Shenk has investigated here is stuff I looked into for Show Your Work!

Some excerpts, below.


How creativity really works doesn’t fit neatly into a traditional narrative

The lone-genius idea has become our dominant view of creativity not because of its inherent truth — in fact, it neglects and obscures the social qualities of innovation — but because it makes for a good story.

The network model has the opposite problem. It is basically true, but so complex that it can’t be easily made into narrative. Where the lone-genius model is galvanizing and simplistic, the network model is suitably nuanced but hard to apply to day-to-day life.

Shenk says the “creative pair,” on the other hand, gives us a clearer narrative as an anecdote to the lone-genius myth without getting scrambled by the messiness of networks.

The trouble with this knowledge is that people want the lone genius myth — something marketers certainly know:

Members of an audience want to identify with a single individual, a person with whom they can have an imagined relationship. It’s well known in publishing that coauthored books are generally a tougher sell than works by single authors because readers expect (often unconsciously) to be in direct communion with an author.

This is backed up by studies that have found “viewers value single creator art better than art created through a collaborative process”:

Our perception of art… is largely dictated by the amount of time and effort we think went into it. This notion was first put forth by Denis Dutton in his book The Art Instinct: Beauty, Pleasure, and Human Evolution, where he argued that we evaluate art not just by the final product, but also by the process that created it. We then use our evaluation of the process and final product to determine the quality of the piece we are admiring.

So, if people value our work based on what we tell them about our process, is our duty to be honest about how we work, or to give them a good story that makes them feel good about the work?

The lone genius idea is wrapped up in our Romantic notions of the individual and the self

…it’s a fantasty, a myth of achievement predicated on an even more fundamental myth of the enclosed, autonomous self for whom social experience is secondary.

The “lone genius” is usually backed up by a partner who remains in the shadows.

Take the couple I just wrote about: George Lucas and his first wife, Marcia. Or William Wordsworth and his sister, Dorothy. Or Tiger Woods — his caddy, Steve Williams wouldn’t just carry his bag, but he’d give him wrong yardage to compensate for his distance problems and he’d taunt him to “get his blood up,” and “deliberately misled him when he thought it would improve his play.”

There’s also a hilarious story about Picasso and his girlfriend, Francoise Gilot—every morning the chamber made would bring him coffee and toast and then he’d begin this ridiculous process:

Picasso “would groan and began his lamentations… He would complain of his sicknesses… He would declare his mercy, and how little anyone understood it. He would complain about a letter from [his ex-wife] Olga. Life was pointless. Why get up. Why paint. His soul itches. His life was unbearable.”

Then Gilot would basically have to convince him to get out of bed, and after AN HOUR, he’d finally get up.

As Shenk writes, “No one is freed of the burdens of everyday life. One may, however, outsource them.”

(Speaking later of John Lennon, Shenk has another good line: “No grownup lives like a kid unless someone around him takes the adult role.”)

“We need to be able to get wired up without overheating, and disconnect without going cold.”

Finding a balance between is tricky, and depends on the individual.

John Lennon, for instance, was so devoid of an internal relation that he had a hard time being by himself. “His reclusive lifestyle notwithstanding,” his friend Pete Shotton said, “John could never bear to be left completely alone — even when he was composing his songs. Much of my time at Kenwood was spent idly reading or watching TV while John, a few feed away, doodled at the piano or scribbled verses on a scrap of paper.” “If I am on my own for three days, doing nothing, “ [Lennon] told Hunter Davies in 1967, “I’m just not here…I have to see the others to see myself.”

And:

The art of living, as [Esther] Perel wrote, is to “balance our fundamental urge for connection with the urge to experience our own agency.”

(Which, come to think of it, reminds me of this Rob Walker quote I almost used in SYW.)

Side note: Simone de Beauvoir and Jean Paul Sartre used to work in the same cafe but at separate tables.

Even Emily Dickinson needed to connect.

She just had to do it through words.

”Her letters are beyond brilliant,” Christopher Benfey, a Dickinson authority who teaches at Mount Holyoke College, told me, “and you can’t really understand her as a poet and a writer without seeing that she approached this form, alongside her poetry, with equal energy and commitment.”

Dickinson wrote poems for specific people in her life and mailed them — she even sent “more than two hundred letters and two hundred and fifty poems” to her sister-in-law Susan, “even though they lived next door to each other.”

A good rivalry, if used constructively, can push the opposite parties further than they could go on their own.

Witness Lennon and McCartney’s competitiveness (Lennon said his new album would “probably scare [Paul] into doing something decent and then he’ll scare me into doing something decent, and I’ll scare him, like that.”) or Larry Bird and Magic Johnson.

“The feeling of rivalry,” [William James] said, ”lies at the very basis of our being, all social improvement being largely due to it… The deepest spring of action in us is the sight of action in another. The spectacle of effort is what awakens and sustains our own effort.”


On a side note to all this, I have a bad habit when reading books of wondering to myself what other structures the book could’ve taken, and whether I would have done it differently. I do wonder how this would’ve read if the “grand theory” of collaboration were stripped out and each creative pair were given their own chapter, with the stories simply juxtaposed against each other. This idea is actually alluded to in Shenk’s (rather strange, actually) epilogue:

About a year ago a friend of mine, an accomplished editor and Pulitzer Prize-winning writer, told me that the plan for the book — to consider scores of stories alongside one another — was nuts.

Shenk himself seems to have realized it is the stories of these pairings that really fly:

I’ve pushed for organization via the traditional mode of narrative; [my editor] has pushed for a more audacious organization by idea.

And that he’s well aware (as we all are) that this book is going on a certain spot in the bookstore shelves:

My job is to push against the conventions of “big idea” books. Eamon’s job is to hold the project to the primary necessities of the form.

Regardless, I found this a fascinating read. It comes out next week.

Filed under: my reading year 2014

Batman has a truly crazy constabulary of villains. Sure, there are the A-listers, like the Penguin, the Joker, Two-Face, Killer Croc, and Bane. But that’s just the start. What about the Penny Plunderer, Kangaroo Kiley, Professor Powderer, Son of Pyg, or Mister Mammoth? Chances are, you’ve never heard of them.
That’s a gap in your education that the latest infographic from Pop Chart Lab wants to set right. The second volume of its Myriad Monikers Of Gotham’s Villain Chart, Pop Chart’s new infographic groups pretty much every bad guy the Dark Knight has ever pummeled into one flowchart.
http://www.fastcodesign.com/3033449/infographic-of-the-day/a-map-of-every-batman-villain-ever

Batman has a truly crazy constabulary of villains. Sure, there are the A-listers, like the Penguin, the Joker, Two-Face, Killer Croc, and Bane. But that’s just the start. What about the Penny Plunderer, Kangaroo Kiley, Professor Powderer, Son of Pyg, or Mister Mammoth? Chances are, you’ve never heard of them.

That’s a gap in your education that the latest infographic from Pop Chart Lab wants to set right. The second volume of its Myriad Monikers Of Gotham’s Villain Chart, Pop Chart’s new infographic groups pretty much every bad guy the Dark Knight has ever pummeled into one flowchart.

http://www.fastcodesign.com/3033449/infographic-of-the-day/a-map-of-every-batman-villain-ever

Wow…Alex Ross does Archie and it’s beyond cool. Wow.

Wow…Alex Ross does Archie and it’s beyond cool. Wow.

My Four Moods…

My Four Moods…

I don’t want to live in a country where no one ever says anything that offends anyone.That’s why we have Canada. That’s not us.
Bill Maher